Frequently Asked Questions

Do you accept children mid-year?

Yes, we have rolling admissions. Each application is evaluated on an individual basis to determine if our school is a good fit for student, family, and teacher.

Children transferring to CGS in the lower grades are usually up to grade level in reading, math, and basic academic skills. However, they might experience a learning curve with bodily coordination skills, artistic activities, cursive handwriting, listening skills, and public speaking.

What is the daily routine at City Garden School?

Our kindergartners follow daily, weekly, and seasonal rhythms that offer structure and security to our youngest students. Each day includes time outside, an artistic activity, free play, practical work, circle time, a shared meal, and more time outdoors.

Our grade school students begin the day with a two-hour main lesson. Main lessons are taught in multi-week blocks so that classes can delve deeply into a subject. Specialty classes and skills practice periods round out the day, which also includes two recesses, snack, and lunch. The grade school week also includes regular chore periods when our students learn to tend to our shared environment.

How do students fare when transferring to CGS from public school?

We have students transfer to CGS in every grade. In every grade and subject, teachers are prepared to support students in their adjustment to a new learning environment.

Children transferring to CGS in the lower grades are usually up to grade in reading, math, and basic academic skills. However, they might experience a learning curve with bodily coordination skills, artistic activities, cursive handwriting, listening skills, and public speaking.

What is the school's policy on electronic media?

We are dedicated to nurturing children’s capacities for creative imagination, healthy emotional development, independent critical thinking, and constructive work in the world. Mainstream society generally recognizes that many activities and tools that are useful and appropriate for adults can be unhealthy for the growing child. Research on child development increasingly demonstrates that spending time in front of a video screen and with other electronic media falls into this category. Extensive brain research and practical experience from teachers, parents, and physicians have found that the effects of electronic media and screen time can show up academically and socially in the following ways:

  • children may be less able to concentrate, and listening skills may be diminished;

  • possibilities for creative expression in artwork may be limited;

  • social problem-solving in play may deteriorate;

  • the ability to participate fully in real-world activities going on around them may decrease;

  • the visual and auditory development needed for reading, writing, and math may be inhibited;

  • muscle tone and core strength may be weakened by lack of movement in these critical years of sensorimotor growth, affecting balance, spatial orientation, and overall physical coordination;

  • sleep may be disturbed, affecting overall health and immune function.

The faculty invites parents to work with us as partners in continued reflection and informed guidance on the use of media and computer/electronic technology in the lives of our children and students. While this may seem a daunting task at first, more and more families and schools have implemented a media-limiting process with positive (often, very positive) results. The teachers and parent community can provide each other with moral support, practical suggestions, and research on related topics. Parents are encouraged to speak to teachers about their questions and challenges related to electronic media and computer use so that together they can create a plan to promote the family’s goals for their children, and for the class as a whole.

Do you offer financial support for families?

Our aim is to make Waldorf education available to as many families as possible. We work on a tiered tuition model so that finances are not an obstacle to attending CGS and offer scholarships when appropriate and feasible.

Is CGS a religious school?

No. While we value the development of the soul and spirit of the child as well as the intellectual and physical capacities, we do not adhere to any religious belief system. Our students hear fairytales and myths from various cultures and go on to study many of the world’s religions.